The Lost Man

A haunting mystery of family, abuse, regret, and second chances…a mystery that demands to be solved.

Synopsis:

Set in the scorching outback of Australia where the few residents can go weeks without outside contact, and tourists have mostly been warned away from the life threatening dangers of an unforgiving land, a family has to deal with the sudden and mysterious death of one of their own.

Local good guy Cameron Bright is found miles from his parked car, having died of dehydration in the scorching heat of the desert. His death leaves the town and his family wondering how it could have happened, and if it really was a suicide. His older brother, Nathan, doesn’t believe that, and has to dig through years of repressed memories of a troubled family life to uncover the truth.

Review:

This was a surprisingly quick read, as the mystery and tension piqued my interest and had me reading just ONE more chapter…and maybe just one more…

The Lost Man is a compelling and complicated story about families and abuse, about regret and struggle, about loneliness and second chances. This is a heavily emotional and character-driven story that feels fast paced, despite most of the action coming from memories. Some things I guessed would happen, but there are a few great twists that were surprising and welcomed, even despite the emotional fallout. A beautiful and desolate tale that is woven in a slightly cinematic feel and pace.

“They lived in a land of extremes in more ways than one. People were either completely fine, or very not.”

The Lost Man
by Jane Harper
Kindle Edition, 352 pages
Published February 5th 2019 by Flatiron Books (first published October 23rd 2018)

Summary

A haunting mystery of family, abuse, regret, and second chances...a mystery that demands to be solved.

— Cassie
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