Beyond The Moon

Beyond the Moon is a beautiful and substantive novel about a love through the centuries, cloaked in historical detail and social commentary. It’s empathetic, haunting, and gritty.

 

Synopsis:

Louisa Casson, a British medical student in 2017, finds herself in a mental institution after an unfortunate accident. While in the incompetent institution, Louisa stumbles upon a timeslip that sends her back to 1916, as a war nurse in the midst of WWI. She meets and falls in love with Robert Lovett, an officer fighting in the war. Slipping back and forth between centuries, Louisa must race against time and destiny to find her true home.

He could feel it tempting him: the possibility of staying with her here forever, enveloped in timelessness…

— Catherine Taylor

Review:

What a complex, delicious surprise this novel was!

With all time travel stories – Outlander, What the Wind Knows, Recursion, etc – there are always moments of disbelief and incredulity. But it’s time travel. At some point, you just have to go with it (glaring inconsistencies aside)!

Beyond the Moon is thoughtfully done with how it incorporates and accounts for time travel. The movements through time feel fluid and natural. My one critique would be a lack of adequate dates at the beginning of chapters. The first half of the book has the dates at the beginning of some of the chapters, but the second half has none at all.

On the romantic aspect of the novel, I was prepared for more of a sappy romance, but was surprised that the relationship is but one player in this story. There are 200 pages in the middle of the book where Robert and Louisa aren’t together – where they’re searching for each other. That section is full of well-researched, intricate details about the world around them, giving the novel broader context.

What this book lacks in romantic fluff, it instead is filled with thorough and candid depictions of mental illness, faulty mental health protocols in care settings, medical procedures and how they vary between centuries, and the historical intricacies of WWI. Catherine Taylor was meticulous in her research and attention to detail, which is something that often goes unrewarded when it’s unexpected.

Overall, Beyond the Moon is a beautiful and substantive novel about a timeless love cloaked in historical detail and social commentary. It’s empathetic, haunting, and gritty. Reading about Louisa and Robert’s lives (in both centuries) feels cinematic and visceral. I can’t recommend this book enough!

 

Book Details:

Beyond The Moon
by Catherine Taylor
Paperback, 494 pages
Published June 26th 2019 by The Cameo Press Ltd

*Shortlisted for the Eharmony/Orion Write Your Own Love Story Prize 2018/19

Thank you to The Cameo Press Ltd and Catherine Taylor for a complimentary copy in exchange for my honest opinion. I voluntarily reviewed this book, and all opinions expressed are my own.

Summary

Beyond the Moon is a beautiful and substantive novel about a love through centuries, cloaked in historical detail and social commentary. It's empathetic, haunting, and gritty. Reading about Louisa and Robert's lives (in both centuries) feels cinematic and visceral. I can't recommend this book enough!

— Cassie
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